You better make sure your drain spouts are all on correctly and that your sub-pump is set to go.  We are expecting some very heavy rain over the next three days that could give us over TWO inches of rain and maybe even some wet snow on the back end of this storm on Sunday.  That snow could accumulate a little bit in western North Dakota.  We would likely see very little accumulation of snow in Bismarck Mandan.

According to the National Weather Service in Bismarck, we can look for a quick shot of rain this morning.  This is not the main system that will hit us late tonight with the heavy moisture.  Skies will actually become mostly sunny today and warm into the mid-50s.  Definitely the nicest day of the week.  There will be a noticeable breeze however out of the southeast but what else is new?

Rain is expected to begin Friday morning and it will continue through the overnight Saturday.  Two inches plus of liquid moisture is expected for Bismarck Mandan and central North Dakota.  This rain will eventually move to the east and will definitely impact the flooding already going on in eastern North Dakota.

To give you an idea of how much two inches of rain would be if this were a snow event, we would likely be looking at two feet or more of snow.  I guess I'll take the rain, but basement flooding will be a possibility for people over the next few days.  Grab your umbrella.


 

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